An Eclectic Collection

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(Source: ribly)

jtpupzone:

Oh how they’ve grown!

laughingsquid:

Panamanian Couple Rescues and Rehabilitates Wayward Sloths For Release Back Into the Wild

doctorsdemons:

whitedarryl:

asatira:

elfgrove:

mmemento:

leaper182:

bead-bead:

the-writers-ramblings:

i cant even make it past the table of contents im laughing too hard

WHAT IS THIS BOOK!?!

It’s called “Zeus Grants Stupid Wishes: A No-Bullshit Guide to World Mythology”
By Cory O’Brien, and it looks highly entertaining. :D

Gilgamesh: THE ULTIMATE BROMANCE

Give it here, now.

Sweet Fluffy Gods why is there not an audiobook version?

I need to find this book.

The first time Iv’e wanted to read something since Metro 2033.

guys

guys…look what we did :D

(Source: thewritersramblings)

thefirecannotkillthedragon:

twerkin-spongebob:

You didn’t

I did I’m sorry

harpistin221bwinchesteralley:

ibelieveinsher0ck:

stopholdingontoair:

It’s weird to think about how your birth is a fixed point in time but your death is constantly moving based on the decisions you make. The length of your life is always fluctuating.

Woah

image

favorite people: Chris Evans
”I decided to make ‘Captain America’ because I realized I wasn’t doing the film because it terrified me. You can’t make decisions based on fear.”

coolchicksfromhistory:

Edentown Tea Party
Art by Tara (tumblr)
Protests broke out across the thirteen colonies in response to the Tea Act of 1773.  All but one were organized by men.  
On October 25, 1774 a group of fifty one women led by Penelope Barker met at the home of Elizabeth King and signed a resolution to boycott all British cloth and tea.  
Penelope, the richest woman in North Carolina at the time, mailed the resolution to a London newspaper.  Although the women were mocked in the British press, they drew praise in the colonies and strengthened the boycott of British goods.  

coolchicksfromhistory:

Edentown Tea Party

Art by Tara (tumblr)

Protests broke out across the thirteen colonies in response to the Tea Act of 1773.  All but one were organized by men.  

On October 25, 1774 a group of fifty one women led by Penelope Barker met at the home of Elizabeth King and signed a resolution to boycott all British cloth and tea.  

Penelope, the richest woman in North Carolina at the time, mailed the resolution to a London newspaper.  Although the women were mocked in the British press, they drew praise in the colonies and strengthened the boycott of British goods.  

ravenclaw-queen:

In which Draco and Harry dress a little too quickly after a meeting

I don’t even ship it and this is awesome

(Source: scaredpotter)